There are movies you hate because they’re executed poorly, and then there are movies you hate simply because they’re unlikable, regardless of quality. 2012’s Bachelorette is both.

Three self-absorbed and mean-spirited high school friends reunite for the wedding of Becky, played by Rebel Wilson, their overweight friend who was known as “Pig Face” by her classmates, present company included. The night before the wedding, Regan (Kirsten Dunst), Gena (Lizzy Caplan), and Katie (Isla Fisher) accidentally rip Becky’s wedding dress after making fun of its size when she isn’t there. The three of them embark on an “adventure” as they attempt to fix the dress, but obviously only make things worse.

The three main characters may very well be the most unlikable leads ever. In fact, this movie is filled to the brim with detestable characters who the filmmakers attempt to have us sympathize with throughout their obnoxious journey, even though any preexisting moral compass flounders beneath contradictory motives and unredeemable actions

A similar movie, The Hangover, also features a trio of friends on a mission concerning a fourth member, Doug. Doug is a flat character with nothing to do, merely serving as a plot device. But the other three actors in that film are hilarious. In a comedy, you don’t make your funniest talent the Doug. However, that’s what Bachelorette does, underutilizing Wilson—easily the funniest of the bunch—by burying her in the background with absolutely nothing to do. To make matters worse, the filmmakers inexplicably try to give the Australian native an atrocious American accent. Just stop.

The rest of the cast is marginal at best with lackluster comedic attempts, with the exception of a good line or two from Adam Scott, who plays Gena’s old lover from high school.

A similar movie, The Hangover, also features a trio of friends on a mission concerning a fourth member, Doug. Doug is a flat character with nothing to do, merely serving as a plot device. But the other three actors in that film are hilarious. In a comedy, you don’t make your funniest talent the Doug. However, that’s what Bachelorette does, underutilizing Wilson—easily the funniest of the bunch—by burying her in the background with absolutely nothing to do. To make matters worse, the filmmakers inexplicably try to give the Australian native an atrocious American accent. Just stop.

The rest of the cast is marginal at best with lackluster comedic attempts, with the exception of a good line or two from Adam Scott, who plays Gena’s old lover from high school.

Even if you miraculously happen to enjoy the talent on screen, the script and narrative will surely have you frustrated to no end, with a tone completely derailed right out the gate and a rushed emotional trajectory riddled with overly-expository dialogue and forced sentiment.

Bachelorette tries to salvage heart in the end, but it’s much too late. Why would we want to see the development of shallow characters who we can’t stand? Especially when it’s just shoehorned in at the last minute. For nearly the entire film their selfishness is put on a pedestal and justified while we sit back and are told to laugh at how they’re more concerned with their own wants and needs over those around them. Selfishness often isn’t that funny—especially at the cruel expense of an innocent victim. In the end, the three bullies don’t learn any lessons because their selfishness still gets each of them what they want anyway. And we’re supposed to be happy about it? This isn’t quite my least favorite movie of all time, but it’s pretty close.

About the Author: Ethan Brehm

Ethan Brehm

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